Elephantiasis A Medical Dictionary

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As a result, those individuals who are regularly active outdoors at night and those who spend more time in remote jungle areas are at an increased risk of contracting the filariasis infection. In cases of lymphatic filariasis, the most common form of the disease, the disease is caused by the adult worms actually living in the lymphatic vessels near the lymph nodes where they distort the vessels and cause local inflammation.

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In advanced stages, the worms can actually obstruct the vessels, causing the surrounding tissue to become enlarged. In Bancroftian filariasis, the legs and genitals are most often involved, while the Malayan variety affects the legs below the knees. Repeated episodes of inflammation lead to blockages of the lymphatic system, especially in the genitals and legs. This causes the affected area to become grossly enlarged, with thickened, coarse skin, leading to a condition called elephantiasis.

In conjunctiva filariasis, the worms' larvae migrate to the eye and can sometimes be seen moving beneath the skin or beneath the white part of the eye conjunctiva. If untreated, this disease can cause a type of blindness known as onchocerciasis.

filariasis

Symptoms vary, depending on what type of parasitic worm has caused the infection, but all infections usually begin with chills, headache , and fever between three months and one year after the insect bite. There may also be swelling, redness, and pain in the arms, legs, or scrotum. Areas of pus abscesses may appear as a result of dying worms or a secondary bacterial infection.

The disease is diagnosed by taking a patient history, performing a physical examination , and by screening blood specimens for specific proteins produced by the immune system in response to this infection antibodies. Early diagnosis may be difficult because, in the first stages, the disease mimics other bacterial skin infections. To make an accurate diagnosis, the physician looks for a pattern of inflammation and signs of lymphatic obstruction, together with the patient's possible exposure to filariasis in an area where filariasis is common.

The larvae microfilariae can also be found in the blood, but because mosquitos, which spread the disease, are active at night, the larvae are usually only found in the blood between about 10 pm and 2 am. Either ivermectin, albendazole, or diethylcarbamazine is used to treat a filariasis infection by eliminating the larvae, impairing the adult worms' ability to reproduce, and by actually killing adult worms.

Unfortunately, much of the tissue damage may not be reversible. The medication is started at low doses to prevent reactions caused by large numbers of dying parasites.

elephantiasis

Diethylcarbamazine, for example, can cause severe allergic reactions and the formation of pusfilled sores abscesses. These side effects can be controlled using antihistamines and anti-inflammatory drugs corticosteroids.

Filariasis

Rarely, treatment with diethylcarbamazine in someone with very high levels of parasite infection may lead to a fatal inflammation of the brain encephalitis. In this case, the fever is followed by headache and confusion, then stupor and coma caused when massive numbers of larvae and parasites die. Other common drug reactions include dizziness, weakness, and nausea. Symptoms caused by the death of the parasites include fever, headache, muscle pain, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting , weakness, dizziness, lethargy, and asthma. Reactions usually begin within two days of starting treatment and may last between two and four days.

senrei-exorcism.com/images/child/cell-phone-line-tracker-huawei-p30.php No treatment can reverse elephantiasis. Surgery may be used to remove surplus tissue and provide a way to drain the fluid around the damaged lymphatic vessels. Surgery may also be used to ease massive enlargement of the scrotum.

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Looking for online definition of elephantiasis in the Medical Dictionary? elephantiasis explanation free. What is elephantiasis? Meaning of elephantiasis medical. Read medical definition of Elephantiasis. Elephantiasis: Lymphatic filariasis, a mosquito-borne parasitic disease caused by tiny thread-like worms that live in.

Elephantiasis of the legs can also be helped by elevating the legs and providing support with elastic bandages. The outlook is good in early or mild cases, especially if the patient can avoid being infected again. The disease is rarely fatal, and with continued WHO medical intervention, even gross elephantiasis is now becoming rare. The best method of preventing filariasis is to prevent being repeatedly bitten by the mosquitoes that carry the disease. Some methods of preventing insect bites include the following:.

In addition, filariasis can be controlled in highly infested areas by taking ivermectin preventatively before being bitten. Currently, there is no vaccine available, but scientists are working on a preventative vaccine at this time.

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Abscess — An area of inflamed and injured body tissue that fills with pus. Antibody — A specific protein produced by the immune system in response to a specific foreign protein or particle called an antigen. Conjunctiva — The mucous membrane that lines the inside of the eyelid and the exposed surface of the eyeball. Often a result of an obstruction in the lymphatic system caused by infection with a filarial worm. Encephalitis — Inflammation of the brain. Lymphatic system — The circulatory system that drains and circulates fluid containing nutrients, waste products, and immune cells, from between cells, organs, and other tissue spaces.

Microfilariae — The larvae and infective form of filarial worms. Subcutaneous — The area directly beneath the skin. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control. King, J. Bug Bytes.

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Louisiana State University Medical Center. Most often encountered in central Africa, the southwest Pacific, and eastern Asia, the disease also occurs in the West Indies and in tropical South and Central America. It is transmitted by the Culex mosquito or by mites or flies. The larvae invade lymphoid tissues and then grow to adult worms 2 to 5 cm long. The resulting obstruction of the lymphatic circulation causes swelling, inflammation, and pain.

Repeated infections over many years, with impaired circulation and formation of excess connective tissue, may cause enlargement of the affected part, usually a limb or the scrotum. In cases of extreme enlargement, known as elephantiasis , the part may swell to many times its normal size.

Filariasis ... Elephantiasis

The larvae can be killed by treatment with diethylcarbamazine. Filariasis is occasionally found in the United States, especially among immigrants from the Caribbean and Pacific islands. A larvae matures into an adult worm within six months to one year and can live between four and six years.

Each female worm can produce millions of larvae, and these larvae only appear in the bloodstream at night, when they may be transmitted, via an insect bite, to another host. A single bite is usually not enough to acquire an infection, therefore, short-term travelers are usually safe. A series of multiple bites over a period of time is required to establish an infection. As a result, those individuals who are regularly active outdoors at night and those who spend more time in remote jungle areas are at an increased risk of contracting the filariasis infection.

In cases of lymphatic filariasis, the most common form of the disease, the disease is caused by the adult worms actually living in the lymphatic vessels near the lymph nodes where they distort the vessels and cause local inflammation. In advanced stages, the worms can actually obstruct the vessels, causing the surrounding tissue to become enlarged.

In Bancroftian filariasis, the legs and genitals are most often involved, while the Malayan variety affects the legs below the knees.

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Repeated episodes of inflammation lead to blockages of the lymphatic system, especially in the genitals and legs. This causes the affected area to become grossly enlarged, with thickened, coarse skin, leading to a condition called elephantiasis. In conjunctiva filariasis, the worms' larvae migrate to the eye and can sometimes be seen moving beneath the skin or beneath the white part of the eye conjunctiva. If untreated, this disease can cause a type of blindness known as onchocerciasis.

Symptoms vary, depending on what type of parasitic worm has caused the infection, but all infections usually begin with chills, headache , and fever between three months and one year after the insect bite. There may also be swelling, redness, and pain in the arms, legs, or scrotum.

Areas of pus abscesses may appear as a result of dying worms or a secondary bacterial infection. The disease is diagnosed by taking a patient history, performing a physical examination , and by screening blood specimens for specific proteins produced by the immune system in response to this infection antibodies. Early diagnosis may be difficult because, in the first stages, the disease mimics other bacterial skin infections.

To make an accurate diagnosis, the physician looks for a pattern of inflammation and signs of lymphatic obstruction, together with the patient's possible exposure to filariasis in an area where filariasis is common.

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Diagnosis and Staging. Lymphatic system — A network composed of vessels, lymph nodes, the tonsils, the thymus gland , and the spleen. Lymphatic Filiarisis elephantiasis is a thread-like filarial worm is passed from person to person through the bite of an infected mosquito. Media Contacts. Characterized by signs and symptoms.